Processes.

I have a confession to make. I can’t type.

Ok, that’s hyperbole. I can type about 70wpm. The thing is, I do so primarily with two fingers on my right hand and occasionally my left index finger. I lacked regular access to computers when I was growing up, and had no occasion to use a keyboard with any regularity until I was in my late teens. So I just hunted and pecked.

When I did start using computers regularly, learning to type properly was hard, and I didn’t really see the point of putting in any effort about it. I mean, who cared how many fingers I used when I was writing in my LiveJournal about my cats? Besides, I was getting really fast with just the fingers I was using!

Fast forward to the present, and I make internets for a living. I’d like to think that nobody’s judging me for the fact that I type like a child, because, well, I’m damned fast and accurate. But I can understand how it might be hard to take a person seriously as someone who uses computers for a living if they type like I’ve been. Additionally, as a developer, it does slow me down; there are more keyboard shortcuts for SublimeText than I’d like to admit that I can’t properly utilize. And I don’t expect to ever learn vim this way, either.

So, as of earlier today, including this entry, I’m going to ask for a bit of typo and slowness forgiveness in my written communications (particularly in chats and wherever else speed is relevant). I’m typing with two hands now, sort of by touch. It’s slow and my left hand is tired and sore after only a day of it. I’ll be writing most of my code one handed for a bit longer, until I can get either faster or more accurate doing it the right way.┬áIt’s important that I teach myself this new process and retrain my muscle memory, but it’s also important that I not become less productive at work in the meantime. Also, I’d like to not totally lose my freak ability by gaining a new skill.